Workshops & Speakers

Wednesday, September 12

Pre-Conference Driving Tours

*Available to Grantmakers Only

Session Description: Three different funder tour itineraries have been developed to set the geographic, economic and cultural context to provide a deeper view and understanding of the rural communities of Southwest Colorado. Although each tour will visit locations throughout Montezuma County, the themes addressed in each should also reflect a broader context of Southwest Colorado. Each tour will head off in different parts of communities in the County that rely on Cortez for services, education, and commerce. The three tour groups will regroup, as a whole, in Cortez to debrief and share what they seen and learned in a facilitated discussion over lunch. Registrants will have the option to pick one tour to attend.

A Tale of 2 Vibrant Rural Communities | 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Join area leaders to explore community-sustaining development efforts rooted in education, art, agriculture, and the land in eastern Montezuma County.
Locations visited: Medicine Horse Center, Mancos Creative District, and Montezuma Farm to School Project at Dolores Elementary

Creative Tension: Balancing Conservation with Energy Development | 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Local archaeological and energy experts will lead the tour of key heritage sites juxtaposed with vital energy based industries, along with creative educational efforts to nurture the next generation of leaders.
Locations visited: Haynie Site (ancestral Pueblo village currently under excavation); McPhee Overlook, Southwest Open School, Narraquinep reservoir, McElmo Dome, and the Arriola Community School

Thirteen Miles and a World Apart | 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

This tour will visit with Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Leaders at their tribal capital, and will focus on the tribe’s rich cultural heritage as well as some of the challenges and opportunities faced in interfacing with Cortez and the rest of Montezuma County and Colorado.
Location visited: Towaoc

Telling Your Story Pre-Conference Training Make-Up Session (9:00 - 11:30 AM)

Session Description: The Community Resource Center and Anschutz Family Foundation provide these critical training sessions across the host region prior to the three-day conference. The training sessions are geared to help local organizations and agencies understand how to position their nonprofit to compete with Front Range entities, how to use Philanthropy Days to their best advantage, and how to increase their capacity to compete for grants. We include these trainings in your registration fee, and the training is certain to maximize your organization’s exposure to the right funders at RPD.  This workshop is designed to engage both veteran fundraisers and newcomers to the nonprofit world. Come be inspired, and get prepared to make the most of your Rural Philanthropy Days experience.  This abbreviated makeup session is available to any conference registrants that did not attend a previously hosted session.

Pre-conference trainings are highly recommended for everyone and REQUIRED for first-time RPD attendees.

Niki Camarena is a Program Officer with the Anschutz Family Foundation. Having worked in the CO nonprofit sector since 2004, Niki has enjoyed the opportunity to assist communities and organizations throughout the state reach their full potential. Niki holds a bachelor’s degree in Spanish from the University of Colorado Boulder and a master’s degree in International Studies, with concentrations in Nonprofit Management and Human Rights, from the University of Denver.

Nellie Stagg joined Community Resource Center (CRC) as the Associate Director of Rural Partnerships in May of 2018. Prior to joining CRC, Stagg served as a Program Officer with Serve Colorado – the Governor’s Commission on Community Service, overseeing a portfolio rural and developing AmeriCorps programs across the state. At Serve Colorado Nellie built strong partnerships with nonprofits as they sought to meet their local needs through national service, and lead the development of the agency’s three year strategic plan. In her role with Community Resource Center, Nellie works with regional committees and volunteers statewide as they bring Rural Philanthropy Days and additional capacity building programming to their communities.

Stephanie Gommert has been a part of the Community Resource Center (CRC) team since October 2017. Before joining CRC, Stephanie served as a United States Peace Corps Volunteer in Cambodia. Through her role as a Community Health Educator, she had the opportunity to gain valuable skills in rural outreach, youth development, and project management. As CRC’s Rural Philanthropy Days Program Coordinator, Stephanie is passionate about supporting the statewide RPD program and working with partners across the state to better meet the needs of Colorado’s rural communities.

Grantwriting 101 (9:00 - 11:30 AM)

Session Description: This class provides an introductory overview to the process for securing grant revenues: Prospective funder research and relationship building with funders. How to effectively write and edit a proposal for submittal to a funder (what are the questions I’ll need to be able to answer?). Presenting budgets and other financial information, and preparing required attachments. Participants will learn about the various sources of grant funding – government, foundations, corporations and businesses, service clubs and even churches – and how to determine if these offer viable opportunity for an organization. We’ll discuss “the rules of the game,” proven formulas for success (and typical rookie mistakes) and trends in granting. Further, we’ll discuss an organization’s readiness for jumping into the world of grants, and getting organized to do so. This workshop is for those looking to raise money for an organization, program or special project (e.g. capital expansion) and wish to explore grants as a viable part of the overall fundraising strategy.

Illene Roggensack owns Third Sector Innovations, based in Grand Junction, working with Western and rural Colorado’s small/mid-sized organizations to meet fundraising, communications, leadership and other development needs. Illene’s expertise as a grant writer comes from 32 years as a researcher, writer and editor. This experience is coupled with an MBA, a BA in journalism and recognition as a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE). She is a Past President for Colorado Nonprofit Association and has proudly worked with Southwest Rural Philanthropy Days to present the Effective Boards fall training series since 2016.

Southwest Regional Town Hall (1:15 - 2:30 PM)

Session Description: Begin the 2018 Southwest RPD conference with an energizing, collaborative conversation about the nonprofit sector in Archuleta, Dolores, La Plata, Montezuma and San Juan counties. These facilitated, small group dialogues will bring together nonprofit professionals, community leaders, and funders to network and create a collective message of the strengths and assets of the sector. Participants will leave feeling motivated and ready to take full advantage of the RPD conference and leverage their knowledge and passion to establish new partnerships and discover key opportunities.

Maria Fabula, President and CEO of Community Resource Center, brings more than 17 years of experience in nonprofit management, fund development, volunteer engagement, collaboration and business development. Maria has extensive experience delivering training and consulting services to increase nonprofit capacity. Maria earned a B.A. in Political Science from the University of California at San Diego and has spent a majority of her career connecting government agencies, nonprofit organizations and private enterprises to improve community. Her experience includes leadership positions with the Nonprofit Support Center, the Junior Statesmen Foundation and the California State Senate.

Meet the Funders - Round 1 (2:45 - 3:45 PM)

Session Description: The “Meet the Funders” sessions provide an introduction to a group of Colorado grantmakers and an opportunity for peer-learning and networking. Foundation staff will share information on strategic funding initiatives, giving philosophy, and grantmaking process. Nonprofits will gain valuable insight on potential partnerships with each funder and opportunity for open dialogue and questions.

General Purpose Funders: Daniels Fund, NextFifty Initiative, Kenneth King Foundation

General Purpose Funders: Anschutz Family Foundation, Adolph Coors Foundation, Buell Foundation

Healthy Communities: Caring for Colorado Foundation, Colorado Health Foundation

Government Support: State Historical Fund, USDA, Department of Local Affairs

Meet the Funders - Round 2 (4:00 - 5:00 PM)

Session Description: The “Meet the Funders” sessions provide an introduction to a group of Colorado grantmakers and an opportunity for peer-learning and networking. Foundation staff will share information on strategic funding initiatives, giving philosophy, and grantmaking process. Nonprofits will gain valuable insight on potential partnerships with each funder and opportunity for open dialogue and questions.

General Purpose Funders: Daniels Fund, NextFifty Initiative, Kenneth King Foundation

General Purpose Funders: Anschutz Family Foundation, Adolph Coors Foundation, Buell Foundation

Healthy Communities: Caring for Colorado Foundation, Colorado Health Foundation

Government Support: State Historical Fund, USDA, Department of Local Affairs

Thursday, September 13

Welcome Remarks & Economic Impact Study Presentation

Description: Join the Steering Committee as we kick-off the 2018 Southwest RPD Conference! We will begin the day with welcoming remarks and a presentation of the results of the SW Colorado Nonprofit Economic Impact Project, which was conducted to showcase the extent to which nonprofits in the region contribute to the local economy.

Capacity Building Workshops Session 1 (10:00 – 11:30 AM)

Good to Great Boards Part 1: Getting the Right People On Your Board

Track: Board Development & Strategic Planning

Session Description: How do new members get recruited to your board of directors? Is a faithful volunteer offered a board position as a type of promotion? Does your nominating committee scramble to find candidates with a pulse to fill open positions? Does the executive director identify most of your board prospects? The job of building the board is more than just filing slots. It is about being strategic in the way a board looks at its composition and what is needed to build an effective, diverse, and representative board. Good boards wanting to become great boards will take the time to carefully determine who should be at the table and develop a plan to strategically identify, cultivate, and recruit new board members. This workshop will inspire you to rethink your entire board recruitment process, guide you through the board building cycle, and provide ready-to-use templates so you can get started right away.

Denise Clark has been consulting, training and managing change in nonprofit organizations for over 25 years. She is a recognized thought leader, consultant and coach with experience in nonprofit leadership and governance. A popular trainer and facilitator, Denise is known for her spirited and interactive training style. She brings enthusiasm and authenticity to her work and is passionate about strengthening the nonprofit sector and supporting the health and well‐being nonprofit leaders.

Corporate Sponsorship, It’s Not Just a One Night Stand!

Track: Donor Development

Session Description: Corporate Sponsorship, it’s not just a one night stand! Working with corporations is similar to individual donors, the care and nurturing of the relationship is key. Corporate sponsorships require effort from both partners, with clear expectations and mutual participation. There are many benefits for both the nonprofit organization and the corporation as the sponsorship can have an enormous impact on the organization. While providing another source of income, a company’s participation in the nonprofit’s fundraising campaigns and events connects the work of their supporters and customers, gaining new exposure. Nonprofits need to have a deep understanding of their organizations, their capacity and their mission along with a sense of their goals. To secure a sponsorship that will resonate with their audiences and develop into a lasting relationship, they need to consider corporations in and out of their network that share similar values and missions. While exploring personal connections and fostering relationships with corporations, it is important to keep a pulse on the industry news and trends. We will explore how to research, connect with, build and maintain relationships with corporate sponsors.

Susan Lander is a nonprofit consultant working with organizations throughout Colorado. As an executive director for more than 20 years, she raised millions of dollars for the Women’s Resource Center and Music in the Mountains while growing the organizations, their budget and programs. Under her leadership both organizations won the El Pomar Foundation’s Awards for Excellence and the Outstanding Contribution to the Community by the Durango Chamber of Commerce. Appointed by Governor Hickenlooper, she presently serves on the Colorado Creative Industries Council. Born in Bogota, Colombia, raised in Canada she has lived, studied and worked in Europe, South America, Ecuador and Mexico and speaks Spanish.

Beth Drum currently serves as Senior Vice President for Alpine Bank Durango. She has worked with Alpine Bank for 22 years. During her tenure, she has held different positions with the bank, providing her with a broad knowledge of the banking industry; her primary focus has been in bank marketing, business, and community development. She is a Colorado native, growing up in Denver. Beth has a long-standing commitment to philanthropy and community leadership. Since moving to Durango in 2005, she has volunteered and consulted with numerous local nonprofits. She is past-president of the Mercy Health Foundation and the Durango Chamber of Commerce. She served as a board member for the Women’s Resource Center, and has remained an active supporter of the organization. Currently she is serving as a member of the Southwest Council for the El Pomar Foundation, and is on the board of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame. In 2014, she was honored with the Morley Ballantine Award, for her commitment to the community and exhibiting excellence in business.

2018 Ballot Measures and What They Mean for Your Community

Track: Community Development & Advocacy

Session Description: The direct democracy component of Colorado’s civic structure is unique and voters and potential voters need to know the important decision-making role they play in building and maintaining thriving communities. 2018 is an election year. In addition to the partisan candidate decisions, voters will be final policy makers on a variety of issues that directly affect the quality of life for them and their communities. Join us as we help “Connect the Dots” between voting on the 2018 ballot measures with the policies that make our communities thrive. We will help translate the importance of being a voter, and an informed voter, to dispersed community members.

Carol Hedges, Executive Director of the Colorado Fiscal Institute, is an important part of the research, policy and advocacy community in Colorado. As program officer at the Piton Foundation, Carol directed the Denver Workforce Initiative. While serving as a senior policy analyst with the Bell Policy Center, Carol authored Ten Years of TABOR, a comprehensive study of the effects of Colorado’s Taxpayers Bill of Rights. Most recently as the Director of the Colorado Fiscal Policy Institute, a project of the Colorado Center on Law and Policy, Carol’s work focused on creating an adequate, sustainable and equitable revenue system in Colorado.

Colorado Gives Day®: Cohort Conversation for swcogives.org

Track: Tools to Add $$$ to Your Bottom Line

Session Description: In this workshop we will cover the impact and importance of Colorado Gives Day® in SW Colorado. Briggen Wrinkle will share the marketing plan for the SW CO Gives collective. There will be time for nonprofits to brainstorm priorities — from initial marketing efforts to collaborating with others. We will end this conversation with ways to maximize new donor retention efforts. Conversations to be led by Dana Rinderknecht and Briggen Wrinkle.

Dana Rinderknecht joined the Community First Foundation staff in December 2007 and serves the organization as its director of online giving. After she joined Community First Foundation, she helped launch ColoradoGives.org, a year-round, online giving website featuring more than 2,300 Colorado nonprofit organizations. Three years later, she was the driving force behind the introduction of Colorado Gives Day, the state’s largest online giving day. Through these two programs, more than $253 million has been raised online for Colorado nonprofits.

Briggen Wrinkle is the Executive Director of the Community Foundation serving SW Colorado. The Community Foundation serves as a Regional Champion for Colorado Gives. Briggen’s work includes a focus on increasing philanthropy in Southwest Colorado by matching grantmakers with nonprofits. In addition, she concentrates on bringing professional development, capacity building opportunities and creating new grant prospects for nonprofits in our region.

Messaging and Storytelling: Becoming Your Community’s "Golden Child" Nonprofit

Track: Marketing & Messaging

Session Description: There are lots of great missions serving our communities, but it’s virtually impossible to make an organization known within the community by simply doing a good job. This workshop provides guidance on how to effectively communicate your message – tell your story – so people know about your good work, thereby building the perception that yours is the “it” organization in town…whether your cause is children, puppy dogs, art or land! Workshop content centers on the secrets to communications success: frequency and consistency, and understanding audience. We’ll talk about branding (“the process of creating a unique name and image in the stakeholder’s mind, establishing a significant and differentiated presence that attracts and retains stakeholders”) by looking at effective practices in the business and nonprofit worlds, and spend time learning about the unique opportunities nonprofits have for effectively utilizing social media, mass media and other message carriers. The workshop also introduces the concept of storytelling as a powerful communication tool. We’ll discuss how to determine the best stories for telling, and when/how to tell a story. Participants will explore what makes a story come alive, and how to use this to convey the profound impact of the organization’s work.

Illene Roggensack owns Third Sector Innovations, based in Grand Junction and working with Western and rural Colorado’s small/mid-sized organizations to meet fundraising, communications, leadership and other development needs. Illene’s expertise as a grant writer comes from 32 years as a researcher, writer and editor. This experience is coupled with an MBA, a BA in journalism and recognition as a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE). She is a Past President for Colorado Nonprofit Association and has proudly worked with Southwest Rural Philanthropy Days to present the Effective Boards fall training series since 2016.

Nonprofit Financial Literacy 101

Track: Financial Literacy

Session Description: Are your nonprofit’s financials clear as mud? Would you like to have a better understanding of the financial reports discussed during your board meetings or with funders? This is a session for anyone who wants to learn how to interpret basic nonprofit budgets and financial statements, or just needs a refresher. CPAs Michelle Sainio and Sid Zink will review topics such as budgeting, profit & loss statements, and balance sheets. Four Corners Community Bank’s Cortez Market President, Steve Slagle, will discuss best practices, requirements, and other considerations for nonprofit banking.

Michelle Sainio is the Audit Engagement Director and an owner of FredrickZink & Associates, PC. With more than ten years of experience working on audits of nonprofit organizations, Michelle supervises, reviews and manages the work performed by others. Michelle is a graduate of Fort Lewis College and is a licensed CPA in Colorado and New Mexico. She currently is the Treasurer for Durango Food Bank, President of the Four Corners Chapter of the Colorado Society of CPAs, Finance Chair for La Plata County American Cancer Society and is a recent graduate of Leadership La Plata.

Sidny Zink is an Emeritus owner of the firm, having served as the firm’s Audit Director for more than 20 years. Sid has long been the local “expert” in nonprofit accounting. She is a licensed CPA in Colorado. Sidny has more than thirty five years of audit experience – twelve years with a national firm (Grant Thornton) in Denver and the remainder in Durango. Her depth of knowledge and experience is greatly beneficial to organizations in the community.

Steve Slagle joined Four Corners Community Bank in 2013 and has over 18 years of lending experience. Before joining FCCB, Steve was the market manager for another bank in Cortez, and previously worked in Arizona and Wyoming. Steve specializes in agriculture and small business lending, working with local producers, companies, and nonprofit organizations in the Four Corners area. Steve is currently the president of the Kiwanis Club of Mesa Verde and treasurer of the Cortez Chamber of Commerce.

Ready for Launch: Pre-Flight Checklist for Capital Campaigns

Track: Strategic Asks – Capital Campaigns & Grants

Session Description: What are the indicators leaders should look for in assessing their organization’s readiness to undertake a capital campaign? What preparation should ideally be undertaken one, two, and three years in advance of launching a campaign? How might you still proceed if your organization is not as perfectly situated for a major fundraising campaign as you would like? The workshop will address the roles volunteer leadership, a fundraising audit, donor prospecting, a pre-campaign feasibility study, and early gifts can play in setting the stage for a successful campaign. We will also identify common challenges organizations encounter in undertaking capital campaigns and offer potential strategies to compensate for less-than-perfect fundraising circumstances.

Jeff Susor has spent the last twenty years assisting nonprofit organizations sustain their mission through effective fundraising, communications, and program management. Jeff is a founding partner in Praxis Nonprofit Strategies, a consulting firm helping mission-centered organizations to cultivate the relationships and resources they need to deliver positive change in the world. Jeff’s consulting work includes fundraising planning and support, capacity building, and the planning or implementation of over twenty-five capital campaigns. Jeff lives in Durango with his wife and two sons and is currently working with KSUT Public Radio on the first capital campaign in its history.

Sheri Rochford Figgs has dedicated her career to strengthening Durango nonprofit organizations and was honored by the Chamber of Commerce as Citizen of the Year in 2009. Her professional career has included leadership roles at the Durango Arts Center and Fort Lewis College, where she served on the fund-raising team for the Community Concert Hall and the Center of Southwest Studies. As a volunteer she has served as president of the San Juan Symphony, the Durango Education Foundation, the Community Foundation Serving Southwest Colorado, and the Fort Lewis Alumni Association. Sher believes that fund-raising is all about relationship building and understanding donor’s passion for a project. Sheri resides in rural Colorado with her husband Dan Figgs and has three adult children and six grandchildren.

Carol Salomon is a jewelry artist and accomplished small business owner. She is an active and engaged community citizen and an advisory board member of the STEAM Park Project, the Durango Arts Center, The Women’s Resource Center and the Willowtail Springs Preserve/Education Center. Carol is known for her philanthropic work and, with her husband Norman Broad supports several non-profit organizations in her home community of Durango.

Collective Impact 101: Jumping Over Barriers

Track: Collaboration & Collective Impact

Session Description: This session will introduce the concept of Collective Impact (CI), the five commonly accepted components of CI, illustrate a variety of examples of real-life Collective Impact Initiatives, and will also identify some possible challenges of CI work. The session will include a panel discussion of current Collective Impact projects (local or other) that are at various stages of implementation. Representatives can talk about the differences, key parts, and challenges in various stages of the projects (e.g. planning, initial implementation, allocating funds, evaluation, etc.).

Lynn Urban is the President and CEO of United Way of Southwest Colorado, the backbone organization for a Collective Impact Initiative called Team UP Southwest Colorado. Team UP strives to improve outcomes for kids and families from Cradle to Career. Lynn has a Ph.D. in Social Psychology and has served as a College Instructor, College Dean, small business owner, and Nonprofit leader.

Strengthening Your Survey Design Skills

Track: Evaluation & Planning

Session Description: Surveys have become omnipresent in nonprofit evaluation. A well-written survey generates substantive, actionable data to help you communicate with various key stakeholders. This session will help participants design high-quality surveys by teaching you when surveys are most appropriate, key principles for writing survey questions, best practices for structuring surveys, and how-to tips on survey distribution. Come learn how to write better surveys, generate more informative responses, and get more bang for your evaluation buck! Participants will be guided through interactive activities to help practice and hone their survey skills.

Morgan Valley is an Evaluator with Vantage Evaluation, where she specializes in the intersection of research and evaluation, helping clients implement the most rigorous approaches possible given the constraints of the real world. For the past decade, Morgan has worked to understand how communities and organizations can better promote the health and well-being of all Coloradans where they live, work, and play. Morgan holds a MPH specializing in Community Health from the Colorado School of Public Health, and a MS in Health Communication and a PhD in Health Psychology from Colorado State University.

Regional Issues: Rural Infrastructure

Track: Regional Issues

Miriam Gillow-Wiles is the Executive Director of the Southwest Colorado Council of Governments, covering the five counties and 10 municipalities in region of SW Colorado. In her role of Executive Director, Miriam, is actively working on the development of regional broadband as well as a number of other issues.

Laura Lewis Marchino serves as the Executive Director of the Region 9 Economic Development District of Southwest Colorado. She has worked in economic and community development since 2000 and has a BA in Journalism and Mass Communications, Masters in Business Administration and is a Certified Economic Developer (CEcD).

Peter Tregillus has written grants and developed programs for 20 years at Southern Ute Community Action Programs, and has worked to develop Road Runner Transit and Road Runner Stage Lines during that time. He is a past president of the Colorado Association of Transit Agencies (CASTA). Prior to his time at SUCAP, his career encompassed the fields of job training, affordable housing, and Chicago community organizing.

Elizabeth Salkind, Executive Director, Housing Solutions for the Southwest

Regional Issues: Early Childhood

Track: Regional Issues

Mary Dodd moved to Montezuma County in late 2009 after a long and varied career as an early childhood professional in Texas that included: providing home and center-based services to infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with disabilities and their families in inner-city Dallas; leading an assessment team for 0 – 5 year-olds in a school district; directing a Part C (early intervention) program; teaching and directing research at a university for 25 years; and providing direct and consultative services to families of children with various disabilities through a small private practice. In early 2011 she began volunteering for MECC in a variety of capacities, and in 2013 she became Chief Knowledge Officer and an Expanding Quality in Infant Toddler Care instructor and coach. She enjoys doing almost everything related to infant, toddler, preschool, and family work, and most recently has been providing reflective supervision regionally.

Michelle Carpenter lives in Pagosa Springs, CO and has been in the early childhood field for since 2006. She received her Master’s in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies after completing the Buell Early Childhood Leadership program at the University of Denver. Michelle has been a toddler and preschool teacher, a program director at local non-profit early care and education program, has taught ECE courses at the local community college and is a peer coach for preschool teachers and parent group facilitator of the Incredible Years Program.

Capacity Building Workshops Session 2 (1:00 – 2:30 PM)

Good to Great Boards Part 2: Nonprofit Governance - What the Job Really Entails

Track: Board Development & Strategic Planning

Session Description: What happens after you successfully recruit and elect new members to your board? New board members should be orientated to the organization and educated on what it means to serve on a nonprofit board. By educating new members, they gain the knowledge they need to successfully carry out their governance responsibilities. It is important to bring board members up to speed as soon as possible to prepare them for active participation. Serving on a nonprofit board should be a fulfilling and rewarding experience. Understanding what the job entails improves the board member’s experience and increases the effectiveness of the entire board. Please note that this workshop focuses on the primary roles and responsibilities of a nonprofit board and has been designed for both new and seasoned board members and executive directors. Everyone is welcome! Focus will include the 10 Basic Responsibilities as defined by BoardSource and will emphasize the importance of orientation, ongoing education and personal giving.

Denise Clark has been consulting, training and managing change in nonprofit organizations for over 25 years. She is a recognized thought leader, consultant and coach with experience in nonprofit leadership and governance. A popular trainer and facilitator, Denise is known for her spirited and interactive training style. She brings enthusiasm and authenticity to her work and is passionate about strengthening the nonprofit sector and supporting the health and well‐being nonprofit leaders.

Transform Your Business Model with Social Enterprise

Track: Tools to Add $$$ to Your Bottom Line

Session Description: Nonprofits are inherently built to generate revenue through work that creates social good. However, models for revenue generation including earned income and social enterprise create opportunities for nonprofits to take their ideas and assets to the next stage. This session will introduce the basics of social enterprise: what it is, what it isn’t, and what it takes to be successful in this exciting arena.

Bailey Smith is a recent graduate of the University of Oklahoma with a B.A. in Public Affairs and Administration. During her time in school, she was part of the Capitol Scholars program which allowed her to intern with the Oklahoma State Senate. She later took this experience to travel to Washington, DC to intern for a member of Congress. Before joining Community Resource Center, Bailey spent her summer with Starfish Project, a social enterprise that helps women who have been victims of sex trafficking in China. With her passion for creating sustainable funding for nonprofits, Bailey is excited to be developing the Colorado Grants Guide and supporting the Colorado Nonprofit Social Enterprise Exchange.

Maria Fabula, President and CEO of Community Resource Center, brings more than 17 years of experience in nonprofit management, fund development, volunteer engagement, collaboration and business development. Maria has extensive experience delivering training and consulting services to increase nonprofit capacity. Maria earned a B.A. in Political Science from the University of California at San Diego and has spent a majority of her career connecting government agencies, nonprofit organizations and private enterprises to improve community. Her experience includes leadership positions with the Nonprofit Support Center, the Junior Statesmen Foundation and the California State Senate.

Federal & State Policy Impacting Charitable Giving: Advocacy in Action

Track: Community Development & Advocacy

Session Description: Federal tax reform will impact individual charitable giving and contains other provisions affecting nonprofit organizations. Colorado’s legislature also passed a new law that in 2020 will enable Coloradans to donate their income tax refund to any nonprofit registered to fundraise with the Colorado Secretary of State for at least five years and in good standing. Learn about how these policies could impact and benefit your nonprofit. In addition, the workshop will provide tools and tips for your organization to successfully influence elected officials while observing applicable rules.

Renny Fagan is the President and CEO of Colorado Nonprofit Association. With 1,300 member nonprofit organizations statewide, the Association provides knowledge resources and advocates for the entire nonprofit sector. Renny is a former state legislator, director Colorado Department of Revenue, deputy attorney general, and state director for U.S. Senator Ken Salazar. He serves on Colorado Commission on Higher Education (Vice-Chair), and the boards of National Council of Nonprofits (chair), Mile High United Way, Colorado Channel Authority and Metro Denver Leadership Foundation. A Colorado native, he earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago and a J.D. from Northwestern University.

Value of the 990

Track: Financial Literacy

Session Description:As a not-for-profit organization required to publicly display your tax return, you might as well take advantage of that and use it to your benefit. The 990 should not be a burden, but an opportunity. I often see the same wording used year after year, or a short sentence describing a program or mission that could have more impact. Promote the good work you do while reporting the related expenses and income. Break out items you want to highlight, or combine items you don’t. Or vice versa. Get your board involved in the approval process. Learn the various schedules that are pertinent to your organization. Ensure your 990 is quality, and not an afterthought. Spread the love!

Michelle Kooi, a CPA, is passionate about community and giving back.  She has more than 17 years of experience in accounting, finance, and tax, working with small businesses, individuals, and not-for-profit organizations.  She also provides business consulting and coaching services for clients and provides mentoring and training at Tafoya Barrett and Associates. She is committed to sustainability and utilizing business as force for good.  She was a Board member of KUNC Public radio of northern Colorado, served as an advisory member of the Small Business Development Center of Northern Colorado, was on the Compass Advisory Committee for the Health District of Larimer County and a Life Crisis Support counselor for Crossroads Church.  She is also a certified yoga instructor and health coach.  When not at work, you can find her on the trails or the river near Durango, cooking for friends, or at a bluegrass concert.

Julie Lerudis has worked at the Boettcher Foundation since 2007 and currently serves as the director of strategic initiatives and grantmaking. She is a CPA with more than 25 years of experience in accounting and project management in the nonprofit, healthcare and real estate sectors. She serves as a commissioner and vice-chair of the Denver Urban Renewal Authority, assistant treasurer of Philanthropy Southwest and is a member of Social Venture Partners. Her passion is to strengthen communities and magnify impact through leveraging talent and connecting resources. Outside of work, Julie loves to spend time outdoors with her family and friends.

Moving Mountains: Engaging Vision to Enhance Collaboration

Track: Collaboration & Collective Impact

Session Description: In this session, participants will gain new perspectives in the importance of visioning as a catalyst for thriving within their organization by collaborating with other organizations. Participants will practice what they learn by documenting their vision for a project or their organization through a collaboration tool called “Gainstorming”. The result will not only be something that they will leave with to benefit their organization, but will also help them learn enough about this visioning tool to equip and engage others within their organization to expand beyond what is started in the workshop.

Gregg Liming serves as chair of the Community Pay-It-Forward Club—a local trust serving long-term fiscal “seed” and local champion of community visioning. In addition, Gregg is treasurer of the Dove’s Nest—an early childhood development and care facility. Gregg is also board member of the Dolores County Development Corporation, Beyond the Nest Learning Center, Community Health Clinic and Montezuma Ministerial Alliance. Gregg is pastor of the Dove Creek Assembly of God. He also works as a consultant for a company that specializes in adult education. As a consultant, Gregg develops education delivery systems and consults in competency and human capital management.

Yvonne Wilcox is the founder of the Gainstorming Model, a collaboration tool developed over a five-year period to effectively leverage time, engagement, and productivity in group thinking sessions. Yvonne believes that when people come together to think, it should be the most extraordinary and efficient use of their time. Her inspiration to create the model came after a 23-year career in the field of visual communications, recognizing the need for a collaborative process that would be simple and versatile enough to be used in any organization.

Securing More Donors & Dollars with Limited Time & Budget

Track: Donor Development

Session Description: Nonprofits who are short on time and staff but need to increase funding (without increasing expenses) will learn how to build and execute a right-sized, data-driven development plan during this practical and hands-on presentation. The Executive and Development Directors of emerging nonprofits along with enterprising Board Members will leave this session with the knowledge and templates to acquire new donors, retain existing donors, and cultivate their giving for future major gifts.

Nate Nasralla has helped more than 500 emerging and rural nonprofits – primarily with annual budgets ranging from $1K to $2MM – address their most pressing fundraising challenges, including strategies for donor acquisition, retention, major gifts, board engagement, and grant writing. Nate is a Certified Fundraising Executive and was the co-founder of DonorPath.org, which merged with Network for Good, where he now serves as their Senior Program Director of Impact & Sustainability, where he now manages programs for a number of our state’s community foundations, including the Community Foundations of Southwest Colorado, Gunnison Valley, and Montrose.

How Leadership Style Can Drive Success for an Organization

Track: Evaluation & Planning

Session Description: How does an individual’s leadership align with the evaluation and management of staff?  Each of us possess qualities as a leader which help others identify our values, mindset, actions and responses.  Join Suzanne Phare in this informative workshop about how strengthening your leadership can help drive decisions, discussion and ultimately employee retention, as you build a strong presence in the workplace.

Suzanne Phare has over twenty years’ experience in executive coaching and HR management and currently owns Real Ideal Coaching. She is the former HR Manager at Ska Brewing. Earlier in her career Suzanne worked for companies such as Panasonic, Emerson, and Atari. Suzanne attended the University of Washington, where she holds a bachelor’s degree in Interpersonal Communications. She is a Certified Professional Coach (CPC) by the IPEC as well as a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR). Suzanne currently sits on the board of the Durango Network and the Durango Chamber of Commerce.

The What, Why, and How of Collaborative Grant Writing for Rural Non-Profits

Track: Strategic Asks – Capital Campaigns & Grants

Session Description: This workshop will teach participants how to maximize grant resources through collaborative grant writing with likely (and unlikely) partners without compromising their mission. By exploring the contributions and needs that each agency brings to the table around a common issue, such as promoting healthy youth,  and identifying the role each agency can play, rural non-profits can capitalize on grant opportunities at higher dollar amounts and apply to granting agencies that would otherwise be out of reach to them as sole applicants. We will discuss effective grant writing collaborations, including a step by step look at the process of collaborative proposal development and the management strategies.

Angie Rochat is the Director of Sponsored Research and Federal Relations at Fort Lewis College. Originally from the nonprofit sector, she created the first grants office at FLC, which has been awarded $42.0 million since its inception. She credits efficiency, teamwork, a little luck, and a sense of humor. She is currently an Advisory Board member for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Grants Resource Center and Chair of the Community and Economic Development Task Force. She has a Master’s Degree in Public Policy from New England College and a Bachelor’s Degree in English from Ohio State University.

Cynthia Stengel is the Grants Specialist in the Office of Sponsored Research and Federal Relations at Fort Lewis College where she writes and edits proposals to a wide variety of sponsors, coaches’ faculty and staff in proposal writing, grant management, federal compliance, and assist with project evaluation. Cynthia is a former TRIO Student Support Services Director and has written or co-authored $15 million in TRIO grants since 1996. She is also the CEO of Grant Dancer Consulting LLC providing grant writing, training and specialized grant consulting services to not-for profit organizations.

Social Media for Nonprofits: Tips & Tricks for Better Results with Minimal Efforts

Track: Marketing & Messaging

Session Description: This session will be an overview of social media best practices for nonprofit organizations, including specific examples and tips from successful nonprofit marketing experts. Liz will present about the mercurial nature of social media marketing, share best practices, tips, and procedures from professionals at small (mostly rural) organizations who have done well (and less well) reaching their chosen audiences with various techniques, practices, and procedures. There will be time at the end of the presentation to answer specific questions and to address comments about the material presented.

Elizabeth (Liz) vonTauffkirchen has worked at Pine River Library (PRL) since 2006, much of that time in Children’s Services with IT and digital services on the side. In August of 2017, PRL finally had the capacity for Liz to become exclusively Digital Services Manager, and she now focuses completely on this important emerging area of library services. Liz has presented at multiple professional conferences on various topics. This will be her first time attending or presenting at Rural Philanthropy Days.

Regional Issues: Interactive Exploration of Food Insecurity in SW Colorado

Track: Regional Issues

Session Description: Join this powerful group of regional food security practitioners for a deep dive into the issues of food security…and insecurity in the Southwest. Together, we will gain a deeper understanding of challenges our region faces in all aspects of our food system from farmers to consumers. Attendees will explore the scope of food insecurity in Southwest Colorado, learn about existing food support programs and efforts underway to address the source of the problem. Attendees will also learn ways to get involved and support efforts to address food security in the region.

Jennifer Banks is originally from Wyoming and began her work in food security at Laramie County Community College in 2014. She started a food bank at the Albany County Campus in Laramie, Wyoming in 2015 with the help of the College and University Food Bank Alliance. In 2016, her work brought her to Adams State University in Alamosa, Colorado where she continued to enhance the local university food bank. She then moved to Pagosa Springs, Colorado and initiated her fellowship with Southwest Growing Partners. She formed the Archuleta County Food System Group through collaboration with community stakeholders. With these partnerships, she was able to pilot a summer food program in Pagosa Springs, Colorado in summer of 2018 with backing from the Colorado Department of Education and the Care and Share food program of Colorado. Jen continues her work in food equity as a community advocate for the Double Up Food Bucks program of Colorado. Jen considers food as love, community, as well as a basic need and right that deserves advocacy at all levels.

Gretchen Groenke has been immersed in the food system her entire life; raised in an agricultural family and community, she has always seen the importance of equitable food systems, and the lack of justice as things are. She has experience working in many different aspects of the food system in a variety of settings, from building community gardens in New York City, to saving seeds in rural Nicaragua, to raising a family, harvesting veggies, and cultivating leadership in Southwest Colorado. She has a deep passion for social justice and building bridges that generate solidarity and contribute to thriving communities.

Rachel Landis‘ CV, in true millennial form, includes professional experiences ranging from outdoor guide to educator to ‘professional homesteader’. Throughout these varied experiences, she has always found ways to integrate efforts to advance food justice, local food systems, and food-centered climate mitigation. In 2010, she took the plunge and moved full-time to Durango where she was the Director at the Environmental Center at Fort Lewis College. At FLC, Rachel coordinated the Real Food Challenge, an institutional procurement program working to revolutionize the food system through shifting purchasing dollars to ‘real’ — fair, humane, ecologically-sound, and local– foods. She also coordinated the EC’s Local Food Security Initiative, a 10-year strong effort to support increased regional food production, expand local food access to underserved populations and educate consumers on the many values of engaging in their local food system. In June, Rachel transitioned to a new role coordinating the Regional Food Recovery Hub, a 3-year effort focused on supporting food security in La Plata and Montezuma Counties by expanding local food recovery and distribution efforts, catalyzing economic and workforce development through food enterprise, and lending support to the amazing people working in both counties to support our local food system.

Pam Willhoite is the founder and lead organizer of Pine River Shares a leadership collective that brings together the knowledge, skills and resources of people in the Pine River Valley to increase collective power and work for change that results in healthy, thriving Pine River Valley communities. Pine River Shares innovative, constituent-led food support programs are designed to feed people and be a forces for community building and transformation in the Pine River Valley.

Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk was born and raised in southwestern Colorado. A member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of Towaoc, Colorado. From an early age Regina has advocated for land, air, water and animals. She attended school and graduated in Cortez, Colorado. She has spent ten years in the Information Technology field working for Chief Dull Knife College, the Southern Ute Indian and Ute Mountain Ute Indian Tribes of Colorado. Lopez-Whiteskunk has traveled extensively throughout the the country presenting and sharing the Ute culture through song, dance and presentations. In October of 2013 she was elected to serve as a member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribal leadership. Lopez-Whiteskunk is a former Co-Chair for the Bears Ears Intertribal Coalition. She strongly believes that the inner core of healing comes from the knowledge of our land and elders. Formerly the Education Director for the Ute Indian Museum in Montrose, Colorado, she is honored to continue to protect, preserve and serve through education, creating a better understanding of our resources and culture. A great foundation for a better tomorrow.

Regional Issues: "Nothing About Us Without Us" - Elevating Youth Voice through a Positive Youth Development Framework

Track: Regional Issues

Session Description: As concerned citizens, we want to know how to best support youth in our communities. At times we make decisions for youth without their involvement in the process. This panel discussion will provide a basic understanding of the Positive Youth Development (PYD) framework, and how it compliments building protective factors for youth. Panelists represent examples of regional youth-adult partnerships, and will provide an overview of the success they have and the on-going struggles they experience to create authentic partnerships. Participants will also walk away with tools to apply PYD in their work with youth.

Katy Pepinsky, Executive Director, La Plata Youth Services

Communities That Care (CTC) guides communities through a proven five-phase change process that promotes positive youth development, improves outcomes and reduces problem behaviors among youth. CTC applies tested and effective strategies that increase resiliency so youth are less likely to engage in problem behaviors and more likely to live according to the clear standards for healthy behavior. These strategies focus on creating a stronger sense of connectedness to their families, community and society. With the support of a dedicated CTC coordinator, this process empowers community members to take ownership for the long term health, safety and well-being of youth.

School Community Youth Collaborative (SCYC) supports youth on their path to healthy adulthood. SCYC believes all youth are valued and thriving members of our community. Their goals are to give youth the tools to create future possibilities for themselves and we strive everyday to create a culture within Montezuma and Dolores Counties where youth are valued, actively engaged and thriving.

STUDents Tackling Unhealthy Decisions are STUDent leaders in Dove Creek, CO conversing within our community to prevent substance abuse.

Capacity Building Workshops Session 3 (3:00 – 4:30 PM)

Logic Models for Government Grants

Track: Strategic Asks – Capital Campaigns & Grants

Session Description: Serve Colorado, the State agency that administers AmeriCorps State programs in Colorado will be providing a Logic Model training for those interested in applying for Federal funding, including AmeriCorps funding, for their organization. Logic Models are visual tools that depict a sequence of events that identify how to achieve a goal. Logic models are required for most Federal grants and serve as the foundation for an effectively written application for funds. This training will build participants’ knowledge and skills for completing a comprehensive Logic Model to submit strong grant proposals.

As Serve Colorado’s Deputy Director, Paul Brown has moved back to the Rocky Mountains for the first time since his first AmeriCorps term as a Crew Leader with the Montana Conservation Corps in 2001. Most recently Paul comes from the Oregon Commission for Voluntary Action & Service (Oregon Volunteers) where he had been the AmeriCorps Program Officer. Paul spent seven years working abroad, initially in Vietnam then five years in Tanzania, first as a Peace Corps Volunteer, then as Program Manager for a USAID-funded nutrition project. Paul is a father, a husband, a hiker, and generally curious.

Analyzing Fundraising Special Events: Trap Shoot or Crap Shoot?

Track: Tools to Add $$$ to Your Bottom Line

Session Description: How effectively are you raising funds through your special events? Are they really worth the significant staff/volunteer commitment of time and effort? What about the risk of actually losing money, or merely breaking even? Do the other benefits of these fundraising events – messaging and media attention, advocacy opportunities, supporter interface – make them worthwhile? Join this discussion to help determine how events fit within your resource development strategy, with topics to include: – Why Assess Special Events? Metrics for Success – What Is the Role of Special Events in an Overall Approach to Development/Fundraising – Top Reasons Events Fly or Fail – Utilizing (and Trusting) Event Assessment Tools. Participants in this workshop will be pushed to “get real” regarding the benefits of special events as we learn about the analytics that indicate whether a given event – existing or being considered – is worth pursuing. For those events we do take on, we’ll learn and share ideas on how to design, implement, evaluate and follow up on special events to maximize their long-term resource development potential.

Illene Roggensack owns Third Sector Innovations, based in Grand Junction and working with Western and rural Colorado’s small/mid-sized organizations to meet fundraising, communications, leadership and other development needs. Illene’s expertise as a grant writer comes from 32 years as a researcher, writer and editor. This experience is coupled with an MBA, a BA in journalism and recognition as a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE). She is a Past President for Colorado Nonprofit Association and has proudly worked with Southwest Rural Philanthropy Days to present the Effective Boards fall training series since 2016.

Annual Maintenance: Board Retreats, Strategic Planning & Self Evaluations

Track: Board Development & Strategic Planning

Session Description:How can you make the most of an annual retreat to chart a course for the year ahead and address board member skills and dynamics? We will outline agenda items for a typical board retreat and pre-retreat preparations by board members, staff, and the meeting facilitator. For many organizations, this is the time to revisit or rewrite their strategic plan, words that often make board members and staff alike nervous. We will address the role of the strategic plan as a road map for the future of your organization and offer a model of a simple, approachable process for setting annual goals. Finally, we will provide a toolkit for addressing representative challenges with board dynamics, including the use of an annual self-evaluation for members and our favorite “tune up” training topics and resources.

Susan Lander is a nonprofit consultant working with organizations throughout Colorado. As an executive director for more than 20 years, she raised millions of dollars for the Women’s Resource Center and Music in the Mountains while growing the organizations, their budget and programs. Under her leadership both organizations won the El Pomar Foundation’s Awards for Excellence and the Outstanding Contribution to the Community by the Durango Chamber of Commerce. Appointed by Governor Hickenlooper, she presently serves on the Colorado Creative Industries Council. Born in Bogota, Colombia, raised in Canada she has lived, studied and worked in Europe, South America, Ecuador and Mexico and speaks Spanish.

Jeff Susor has spent the last twenty years assisting nonprofit organizations sustain their mission through effective fundraising, communications, and program management. Jeff is a founding partner in Praxis Nonprofit Strategies, a consulting firm helping mission-centered organizations to cultivate the relationships and resources they need to deliver positive change in the world. Jeff’s consulting work includes fundraising planning and support, capacity building, and the planning or implementation of over twenty-five capital campaigns. Jeff lives in Durango with his wife and two sons and is currently working with KSUT Public Radio on the first capital campaign in its history.

Civic Engagement for Community Change

Track: Community Development & Advocacy

Session Description: The challenges facing our communities are complex, and nonprofits are trusted messengers and leaders in addressing those challenges. Advocating for our missions and communities is a powerful way that our organizations can cut across political lines and create lasting and impactful change. This session will demystify advocacy, clarify the rules and regulations, and introduce some of the direct and meaningful ways our sector can influence and shape outcomes in the long-term.

Maria Fabula, President and CEO of Community Resource Center, brings more than 17 years of experience in nonprofit management, fund development, volunteer engagement, collaboration and business development. Maria has extensive experience delivering training and consulting services to increase nonprofit capacity. Maria earned a B.A. in Political Science from the University of California at San Diego and has spent a majority of her career connecting government agencies, nonprofit organizations and private enterprises to improve community. Her experience includes leadership positions with the Nonprofit Support Center, the Junior Statesmen Foundation and the California State Senate.

Effective Data Management to Attract More Funding and Grow Operational Capacity

Track: Evaluation & Planning

Session Description: This session reviews the best ways to manage and leverage your data to increase donations and expand your operational capacity. With the tools we’ll demonstrate, you can segment your donors for targeted campaigns, measure the positive impact you’re having on those you serve and easily provide reports to your board and governing agencies. Providing your staff and board members with critical operational data at their fingertips helps your organization increase funding, build capacity and identify ways to improve your services. We will review various options for managing your data, ranging from spreadsheets to cloud-based CRM solutions. We will discuss and demonstrate ways to track details about your services, donors, clients, volunteers and key performance indicators (KPIs). Whether you’re a technology newbie, a spreadsheet master or a database designer, this session will demonstrate new possibilities to improve your services and attract more funding.

Ken Tallman has helped many organizations organize and manage information to improve their effectiveness. He leverages his high-tech background and business acumen to introduce business people to technology, and shows how that technology can be used to fuel their growth. He spent 15 years working in Silicon Valley for industry leaders such as Salesforce.com and Sun Microsystems before moving his family to Durango, CO, where he focuses on helping nonprofits expand their success. Ken was formerly president of the board of The Liberty School, a nonprofit for kids with dyslexia, and is a Certified Salesforce Administrator.

New Nonprofit Financial Standards: What You Need to Know to Comply with ASU 2016-14

Track: Financial Literacy

Session Description: For fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board made substantial changes to how a nonprofit organization presents their financial statements. This session discusses those changes and what a nonprofit needs to do to implement the changes. One major change is how the net assets are presented and disclosed on the financial statements. Another important change is the Statement of Cash Flows. The most difficult change is how a nonprofit presents the liquidity and availability of their assets. The nonprofit’s financial institution, donors and other stakeholders will expect your financial statements to be in compliance with these new accounting standards.

Janice Moen has more than 30 years of accounting experience, 20 years of which were as Chief Financial Officer or Chief Executive Officer of nonprofit agencies. She founded a nonprofit CPA firm based on a shared service model for nonprofit organizations. Janice received a Master in Accounting from the University of New Mexico. She has been a CPA since 2001. Janice was a faculty member at the UNM’s Anderson School of Business for six years. During that time she developed a graduate level class on nonprofit accounting and the IRS Form 990. She also taught financial accounting and auditing.

Planned Giving 101

Track: Donor Development

Session Description: This seminar will be given by a CPA and a lawyer who each have extensive experience in estate and gift planning. This seminar is for every non-profit and charitable organization that relies on donations. We will focus on the concept of PLANNED GIVING and how to incorporate this in your “asks”. Executive directors, development directors, pastors, finance chairs and others are invited to attend. This presentation will provide an overview of various tools and techniques for requesting and increasing donations to charitable organizations through estate planning and other methods, including a discussion of: • Understanding the basics of and differences between wills, probate and trusts • How a charitable donation benefits an estate • Seven different ways to receive $100,000 from a donor • Learn how a community foundation and/or donor advised fund can assist your planned giving strategy • How to promote your goals to appeal to potential donors • How to effectively request any size of donation • Working with the donor’s team of professional advisors • Plus much more

Chuck Forth graduated from London Central High School, England, attended the University of Colorado, Boulder and earned a BA in Mathematics while completing Air Force ROTC. After serving in the Air Force at Nellis AFB for four years, he separated and went to Fort Lewis for classes towards a CPA. In 1999, Chuck earned his CPA and later formed Forth & Associates, PC. He was a founding board member of Onward! in 2002 and become the Executive Director in 2008. Chuck is married to Tess Montano Forth and they have two beautiful girls.

Erin Johnson is an attorney practicing in Southwest Colorado in areas of estate planning, land use, real estate and business. She has an extensive background in the areas of estate and succession planning, business, and real estate development. Ms. Johnson works creatively and effectively with organizations, businesses and families to help them realize their long term goals. Publications: The Good Neighbor Guidebook for Colorado, co-author/editor; Geologic Hazards Avoidance or Mitigation, co-author; Habitat Protection Planning, contributing author; Development Agreements, co-author and is an author of other published works. Admitted to the Colorado bar in 1994.

The Intersection of Statistics and Storytelling: Harnessing the Power of Organizational Data

Track: Marketing & Messaging

Session Description: In the nonprofit world, people often talk about “data-driven efforts,” but demonstrating tangible program impact can be complicated and challenging. This session will provide guidance on how to use existing program and organizational goals and objectives to identify where it makes sense to collect data. Hint: it’s not always in the numbers – often real results of your work are seen through a client’s renewed sense of purpose, or a student’s improved confidence level. Gain an understanding of how to quantify those results and discover simple ways to integrate systems to collect and track people-driven data. Learn how showcase your organization’s impact for stakeholders, donors and funders, and community engagement. This session will emphasize using data for communications, with a focus on pairing data with personal stories because it’s the corresponding narratives that humanize statistics, draw people in, and prompt action. It will also feature a brief overview on how to use the inexpensive online software, Canva for data visualization.

Sloan Gingg, MPH, brings a unique combination of expertise in marketing communications and program evaluation. She began her career in marketing at a national nonprofit before completing a Master’s in Public Health (MPH). After graduate studies, Sloan worked for an Austin-based, behavior-change advertising firm as a strategist, specializing in market analysis and data-driven communications campaigns. Sloan is skilled in evaluation design and synthesizing research results into comprehensible reports. Sloan lives and works in Durango, Colorado, where she began her nonprofit consulting practice, Unclouded Communications, in 2015. Sloan brings a passion for rural economic development and minimizing disparities to every project.

Transforming Community Engagement for Long-Term Success

Track: Collaboration & Collective Impact

Session Description: In 2012, the residents and City of Cortez, CO began a journey together that forever changed local decision-making, community conversations, and the ability to take collective action for the future. After working alongside the Orton Family Foundation for two years on the Community Heart & Soul method, Cortez has continued to explore how storytelling and civic conversation can lead to data, trust and the relationships that result in more tangible actions and strategies to grow what matters most to the community. In this session, you will hear from local leaders and community members about the thoughts behind the tools, planning, and ongoing work in Cortez that continues to engage a broad spectrum of residents, including youth and those whose voices are new to the larger community conversation. Learn how to use the Orton Family Foundation’s Community Network Analysis tool to identify who is in your community and how to best reach them through meaningful public engagement.

Alexis Halbert joined the Orton Family Foundation from Paonia, Colorado where she was immersed in small-town life, serving as Project Coordinator the North Fork Valley Heart & Soul project. She was also Associate Publisher at High Country News, Chamber of Commerce President, and on the board of the Colorado Renewable Energy Society. Her hometown is Winnetka, Illinois (pop. 12,400). Alexis received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan in Globalization and Natural Resource Management, and holds a certification in Project Management from San Francisco State University.

Robby Henes grew up in the Cortez area on a farm/ranch, and left after high school to pursue a college degree and a career in International Agriculture Development. After 15 years working internationally, she returned home to help with the family native grass company, Southwest Seed. Being home again in Cortez, provides her with the opportunity to engage in activities that feed her need for community and her opportunities to give back to the people and places that make this home and a rich vital community. The Orton Heart and Soul process was an incredible learning opportunity for Robby.

Karen Sheek is a retired middle school educator. In October 2011,she filled a vacancy on the Cortez City Council and is now into her second term on Council and her third term as Mayor. Although not part of the original committee that secured the Heart & Soul Grant, Karen worked with the community action team from the beginning and has seen a number of the projects that were identified during the two-year Heart & Soul process, come to pass. Cortez continues to strive toward transparency and to seek community input as the result of what they have learned.

Regional Issues: Arts & Culture for Community Development

Track: Regional Issues

Session Description: In 2015 Colorado’s arts industries contributed $13.7B to the state’s economy, employing 100,631 who earned $7B. The arts contributed more than Mining or Transportation to Colorado’s economy. In addition to clear economic benefits, arts and culture help enliven communities, drive tourism and outside investment and deepen civic engagement. This interactive panel will sample strategies and applied case studies of community building through arts and culture in Southwest Colorado. Attendees will leave with new tools and resources, including the web based DIY three step program CallYourselfCreative.org, to help integrate the arts into community and economic development activities.

Christy Costello is a Program Manager at Colorado Creative Industries, the state arts agency located within the Office of Economic Development. She manages the Colorado Creative District program, annual Creative Industries Summit and serves as the accessibility coordinator. Her background includes museum collections management, non-profit fundraising and event management. Christy teaches graduate courses for the DU University College Arts Management program. She is a graduate of the Colorado Creative Industries Change Leader program, Colorado Business Committee for the Arts (CBCA) Leadership Arts and serves on the CBCA Leadership Arts Alumni network committee.

Sheila Sears is the Deputy Director of Colorado Creative Industries. In that position she is responsible for supporting all programs, services and administration of the agency. Sheila oversees partnerships to provide professional development and networking opportunities for schools and serves as primary liaison to local and national Arts Education collaborators. She is currently serving on the Education Committee of the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs. In 2015, Ms. Sears was awarded the Wayne Carle Award by the Jefferson County School Board for Outstanding Contributions to Diversity and Inclusion for her work leading an arts-based afterschool program for Native American youth.

Bernadette Cuthair is the Director of Planning & Development and Community Services Division for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe. In this position she is responsible for overseeing multi-million dollar grants and contracts for as many as twenty (20) major community development projects annually, including infrastructure, transportation, housing, governmental facilities, parks, recreation and more. In just the past three years alone, Cuthair has spearheaded the following 3 major projects in partnership with the States of Colorado and Utah, as well as the United States Departments of Energy, Transportation, and Agriculture. In 2017, Cuthair collaborated with world renowned architects (Koning Eizenberg Architects) and landscape designers (D.I.R.T. Studio and 10 x 10 Landscape Architects) to complete a Comprehensive Master Plan for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe.

Sarah Syverson was the Co-Director of the Mancos Creative District for a year and previous to that directed the Montezuma School to Farm Project for seven years. She currently works in a contract role with both organizations. In addition to managing non-profits she is the Co-Producer for the Raven Narratives, a live storytelling event and podcast based in Southwest Colorado as well as a writer/playwright. She studied Improvisation and Sketch Writing at Second City in Chicago and has written, produced and starred in humorously poignant original plays throughout the Southwest with great success. Her latest script, The Alchemy of Change, is currently in development for a staged production. She is passionate about storytelling, our fallible humanity, and the quirky and unpredictable ways that we are all connected.

Regional Issues: Sharing Power, Mobilizing for Change - Fostering Diverse Community Discussion

Track: Regional Issues

Session Description: This workshop will explore the best practices, pitfalls, and the opportunities in working with diverse communities seeking to take action on a shared injustice or community dilemma. We will frankly address how problematic power dynamics are often unintentionally perpetuated in our community outreach and organizing efforts, then provide thoughtful considerations for how to conduct outreach, facilitate, and ultimately share power with diverse stakeholders. We will draw from case studies related to Chinook Fund’s Giving Project, an intentionally diverse volunteer community that raises and distributes grant funds for grassroots community organizing efforts throughout Colorado. We’ll be joined by current and former grantee organizations that are active in the region. Chinook Fund has over 30 years of institutional expertise working closely with communities across race and class lines.

Chinook Fund’s Program Director Juliette Lee directs The Giving Project, a six-month program dedicated to transformative community leadership development through social justice philanthropy. Giving Project members work together to deepen their understanding of social justice principles so they can support grassroots organizations that build power for social change in Colorado. Juliette earned a BA in English and Masters in Teaching from the University of Virginia, and an MFA in Poetry with an Advanced Feminist Studies Certificate from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Juliette’s training includes critical pedagogy and intersectional feminist praxis from an ethnic studies standpoint. She has extensive experience mobilizing communities through grassroots fundraising tactics and community dialogue.

Wendolyne Omana was born in Mexico. A strong believer in Social Justice, Immigrants Rights advocacy, and Sanctuary movement, she serves as a Massage Therapist, Food/Nutrition Educator, and Asana & Pranayama Instructor for the underserved populations in Colorado. Currently she advocates in La Plata and Montezuma County. She lives for creating accessible alternatives to the less privileged communities like her own community in order to observe her grandmother’s legacy. Her grandmother, from the State of Mexico, MX., was culturally oppressed as a traditional “curandera,” and learned to honor compassion and love within everything in order to serve the greater good. Wendolyne sits as Vice-President with the board of Directors of the Colorado Immigrants Rights Coalition, and studies Indigenous medicine from India in Albuquerque, NM, and Crestone, CO. Among others, her additional interests include Human Rights, the Disassembly of systems of oppression, Mayan wisdom, and the Neuroscience of crisis. Wendolyne believes that through authentic-hearted movements, the prayers of our ancestors are heard and therefore protection during our activism is granted.

Jennifer Stucka-Benally is one of the founders and a Co-Director of the Four Corners Rainbow Youth Center. Jennifer’s journey to The Four Corners Rainbow Youth Center has been full of experiences; both positive and negative, that have turned her into who she is today and led her to her passion for serving the LGBTQ community. This all started with her interest in the human services field because of her own adoption, along with her own discrimination experienced due to her sexual orientation and witnessing the violence and oppression that all too commonly happens in the system. She has dedicated herself to the field of human services and got her Masters in Social Work and later got her clinical license in social work. She began focusing some of her studies on the LGBTQ population, especially LGBTQ youth in out of home placement. She has also focused extensively on trauma. She also works part time as a mental health practitioner and has a private practice with her business partner Rowan Blaisdell. Jennifer believes in fostering and empowering others to be able to be their authentic self. In her off time she enjoys hiking, camping and anything in the water!

Rowan Blaisdell, The Four Corners Rainbow Youth Center

Friday, September 14

Funder Roundtables (9:00 AM – 12:00 PM)

This is an opportunity for grantseekers to get immediate feedback from potential grantmakers on their nonprofit funding needs. Each grantseeker will have two minutes to give their pitch in “speed-dating” style conversations with grantmakers. Grantmakers will then provide immediate feedback to grantseekers as to whether or not that grantseeker is a good match with their particular grantmaking entity. We ask that each grantseeking organization send no more than two representatives to Friday’s Funder Roundtables. This ensures all organizations have the opportunity to visit with participating funders. Only grantseekers headquartered within the five counties of the Southwest region will be permitted to participate in roundtables.

For more information, please contact:

Kristi Smith, Event Coordinator
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